Freeman

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November 2014

Volume 64, 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.

October 2014

Volume 8, 2014

Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.

September 2014

Volume 64, 2014

For centuries, hierarchical models dominated human organizations. Kings, warlords, and emperors could rally groups--but also oppress them. Non-hierarchical forms of organization, though, are increasingly defining our lives. It's no secret how this shift has benefited our social lives, including dating, and it's becoming more commonplace even in the corporate world. But it has also now come even to organizations bent on domination rather than human flourishing, as the Islamic State shows. If even destructive groups rely on this form of entrepreneurial organization, then hierarchy's time could truly be coming to an end.

July/August 2014

Volume 64, 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.

June 2014

Volume 64, 2014

America's surveillance State has grown far beyond what any of its creators' imagined. In this issue, Wendy McElroy explains that the surveillance State was always more about suppressing dissent than buttressing security. Carl Oberg points out that innumerable nimble innovators have turned the table on the State, while Max Borders wonders if there are enough of them yet to stem the tide. Plus Dan D'Amico discusses the origins and effects of America's mass incarceration, Sandy Ikeda explains why cities can't be designed like art, and much, much more.

May 2014

Volume 64, 2014

There are as many routes to our movement--and to loving liberty--as there are people to take them. While those who focus on doctrinal purity have their place, what matters most is bringing in as many people as possible, and building a vast, multifaceted movement with room for all. In this issue, Max Borders describes this open, varied libertarianism. We continue our interview with Anne Wortham, whose experiences remind us of how much identity politics still plagues the academy. Plus UAW desperation, something you didn't know about Bitcoin and much, much more.

April 2014

Volume 64, 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.

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March 2014

Volume 64, 2014

Should libertarians adopt the language and perspectives of identity politics? Where does that leave the individual? In this issue, Max Borders looks at our intellectual tradition and comes away skeptical that identity politics has any improvements to offer. Anne Wortham discusses her life and career as an individualist in a world anxious to reduce her to a demographic symbol and Sarah Skwire says privilege changes depending on the context. Plus Wendy McElroy looks at America's prison industry, Benjamin Powell discusses sweatshops, and much more.

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January/February

Volume 64, 2014

Phil Bowermaster walks us through the vision of nanotech's founder, his disillusionment with the hype surrounding nanotech--and sketches in the myriad innovations that, hype aside, have brought us to the cusp of a revolution as far-reaching as the agricultural, industrial, and informational revolutions combined. Speaking of revolutions, Jeffrey Tucker reports back from the thriving, vital front lines of culture--taking place, surprisingly, in century-old orchestra halls. Michael C. Munger offers libertarians a positive vision for society to replace the (perceived, at least) contrarianism some libertarians take as the end-all, be-all of the L-word. Everyone knows that the plague was brought to Europe by rats and spread because of changes in the climate; what they don't know, B.K. Marcus says, is the crucial role of power-hungry and tax-crazed rulers in making Europe's societies all the more vulnerable to collapse. L. J. Lane is back with another installment of his Of Mice and Mud comic, and much, much more.

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November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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