Warning: You are using a browser that does not support angularJS. Some site functionality will not be available to you. Please consider updating to a newer version.
FEE.org does not currently support Internet Explorer. Please use a supported browser such as Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

John Chamberlain

Foundation  for Economic Education

George Roche, the head of Hillsdale College, was an early protégé of Leonard Read, the creator of The Foundation for Economic Education. Where did Read pick up this theories? They came from what Roche calls the “historical ash-heap” of Frederic Bastiat, who lived in the French countryside and in Paris in the first half of the nineteenth century.

Doing a book for Read’s Architects of Freedom series in 1973, Roche chose to call it Frederic Bastiat: A Man Alone. The actual fact, however, was that Bastiat had many similarly minded friends. They happened, for the most part, to be free traders in England, such as Cobden and Bright, who brought the free trade idea to France.

The original title was rejected for a new edition with the title, Free Markets, Free Men (Hillsdale College Press and The Foundation for Economic Education, 1993, $14.95 paperback), and a good thing, too. That says it all.

In his introduction, Roche justifies the book’s purposes as a reprint: the need to reinform today’s public of one of “the most intrepid explorers” of free market philosophy. Bastiat was trying to tell people that they couldn’t get something for nothing. That, obviously, has to be said again and again.

See what we've been working on.   Network with FEE's sponsors and donors at FEEcon this June. Visit FEEcon.org.

Related Articles

{{relArticle.title}}

{{relArticle.author}} - {{relArticle.pub_date | date : 'MMMM dd, yyyy'}} {{relArticle.author}} - {{relArticle.pub_date | date : 'MMMM dd, yyyy'}}
{{article.BodyText}}

SIGN UP FOR FEE DAILY EMAIL