AG Barr Signals Support for Tenth Amendment-Style Approach to Marijuana Legalization

Barr said that allowing the states to set their own marijuana policy and removing the federal government from the matter would be an improvement over the present situation.

Lost in all of the media frenzy over the Mueller Report, redactions, and alleged improprieties within the Department of Justice and FBI, was Attorney General William Barr telling the Senate Appropriations Committee yesterday that he favors a more federalist approach to marijuana laws.

Marijuana Legislation Should Be Up to the States

In response to a question from Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Barr said that allowing the states to set their own marijuana policy and removing the federal government from the matter would be an improvement over the present situation, which he called an “intolerable” conflict between state and federal laws. Senator Murkowski is a sponsor of the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, which would give immunity from federal action against business and people engaged in the manufacture, sale, purchase, or consumption of marijuana in states where it has been legalized. President Trump has signaled in the past that he would sign the bill if it was passed and sent to his desk.

Unfortunately, Barr still opposes federal legalization, but his approach to the issue is a stark and welcome contrast to that of his predecessor Jeff Sessions and would amount to de facto federal decriminalization—at least in the states that have decided to legalize marijuana. 

It also signals a realization that the march toward state-by-state legalization continues to gather momentum. Marijuana reduces the need for opioids to relieve pain and studies have shown lower opioid-related overdose death rates when legal. It may be just a matter of a few years before federal decriminalization of marijuana becomes a reality and, as is the case with alcohol, it will be a matter left up to each of the states and the District of Columbia.

Decriminalization should be a welcome change for all who are concerned with the growing rate of opioid-related overdose deaths. There is growing evidence that marijuana reduces the need for opioids to relieve pain and numerous studies have shown lower opioid-related overdose death rates in states where access to marijuana is legal. Furthermore, marijuana has great potential as a harm reduction strategy.

At the recent conference on harm reduction held at the Cato Institute, Dr. Adrienne Wilson-Poe, a nationally recognized cannabis clinical researcher at Washington University School of Medicine, gave a detailed and enlightening presentation on the potential role for cannabis in Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) as well as opioid withdrawal management. You can see that presentation here. Dr. Wilson-Poe was also interviewed on a Cato Daily Podcast here.

This article is reprinted with permission from The Cato Institute. 

Further Reading

{{article.Title}}

{{article.BodyText}}