Freeman

Spoiler Alert

Second-Banana Blues

Veep, cringe comedy, and laughing at Washington so you don’t cry

MAY 13, 2014 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Power-worship in D.C. and shows about it is nothing new. Playing it for slapstick rather than fetishizing it, however, makes Veep a welcome change of pace.

Emotional Dictatorship

MARCH 05, 2014 by MICHAEL NOLAN

A new documentary shows North Koreans as agents of their own liberation.

No Sleep Till Johannesburg

Searching for Sugar Man and spontaneous order

FEBRUARY 05, 2014 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Music creates spontaneous, unpredictable communications directly from person to person. That makes it essential to life--and a persistent threat to power.

Chemistry Is What We Are

Breaking Bad shows exactly how entertainment can become art, and why the distinction matters

OCTOBER 16, 2013 by MICHAEL NOLAN

There's a lot that can be said about Breaking Bad. What's more interesting--and what makes it art--is what our reactions say about each of us.

Matt Damon vs. The Space Republicans

Science fiction with technology that's more realistic than its politics

SEPTEMBER 23, 2013 by ANDREW HEATON

Elysium's cyborgs and floating space colonies are plenty of fun. They're also a lot more realistic than the straw men peopling the film or the economic theory underlying its plot.

Take Me Out to the Cleaners

Crony Capitalism and Stadium Funding

JUNE 12, 2013 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Stadium funding deals amount to making some people's leisure-time preferences a matter of law, then forcing everyone to transfer money to the already wealthy.

The Hair of the Dog

APRIL 08, 2013 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Robert Zemeckis and Denzel Washington team up to present an excellent piece of character development. Then Zemeckis sacrifices all of the nuance for the sake of a tidy ending that presents the State as the realm of the gods.

Zero Dark Maybe

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Sorting out how your political beliefs relate to your entertainment choices isn't always a simple process. When it comes to a movie about the war on terror, though, the stakes get a little bit higher.

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CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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