Freeman

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Uber against Racial Profiling

The sharing economy helps end ethnic and economic discrimination

NOVEMBER 25, 2014 by HOWARD BAETJER JR.

Market forces are regulating racial profiling by taxicabs better than government regulations do. Just ask Uber riders.

The Internet Memory Hole

“The right to be forgotten” — a privacy right or Orwellian incinerator?

NOVEMBER 24, 2014 by WENDY MCELROY

The so-called 'right to be forgotten' may be coming to America. But does it run counter to free speech?

Greedy Corporations Save Lives

Prosperity’s conquest of disease offers lessons for global change

NOVEMBER 20, 2014 by IAIN MURRAY

Multinational corporations are conspiring to save people from disease and make a profit while doing it.

5 More Economic Myths That Just Won’t Die

Another dose of data from free-market reality

NOVEMBER 19, 2014 by COREY IACONO

Still seeing Internet memes that get economics painfully wrong? Often the same anti-market assertions get repeated enough that they are simply taken as true. Here are five more sets of antidotes.

The World Is My Toilet

Children of the Cultural Revolution have different ideas about decorum

NOVEMBER 18, 2014 by STEFAN OTTOSSON

Singaporeans aren't happy about the behavior of Chinese mainlanders. The culture clash is likely due to growing up under two very different sets of institutions.

Too Dumb for Democracy?

Global ignorance vs. local knowledge

NOVEMBER 17, 2014 by B.K. MARCUS

Mass ignorance about an increasingly complex world is a fact of life. And yet we're all supposed to make decisions on matters about which we know little to nothing. It's called democracy.

Jonathan Gruber’s Big, Benevolent Fraud

Obamacare, the noble lie, and cognitive dissonance at MIT

NOVEMBER 17, 2014 by D.W. MACKENZIE

If the ACA benefits Americans, why did it need to be misrepresented?

The Four Core Beliefs of Enterprise

How to solve complex business problems

NOVEMBER 14, 2014 by LAWRENCE W. REED, WAYNE OLSON

It takes a conscious, thoughtful effort to open wide our mind's eye. If you learn to do it systematically, the result can be a new worldview that will reshape how you notice opportunities and capitalize on them.

The Case Against Rent Control

Bad housing policy harms lower-income people most

NOVEMBER 12, 2014 by ROBERT P. MURPHY

If the goal is to provide affordable housing to lower-income tenants, rent control is a horrible policy.

Were We Better Off in 1987?

Down and out among the 90 percent

NOVEMBER 11, 2014 by STEWART DOMPE, ADAM C. SMITH

We are better off today due to the creative innovations of the marketplace. Those who argue we're worse off are ignoring important considerations.

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CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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