Freeman

Economic Notions

The Bias Favoring Governments over Markets

The Success of Markets Is Easily Taken for Granted

JUNE 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Public Interest or Private Interest?

Public Officials Are Self-Interested, Too

MAY 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

The Cure Can Be Worse than the Disease

We Need Government Action Less Often Than We Think

MARCH 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Prisoners' Dilemmas and Cooperation

Free Markets Reward Cooperation

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Getting the Most Out of Pollution

How about a Market for Pollution Rights?

OCTOBER 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

The Environmental Protection Agency's attempt to reduce pollution with command and control suffers from the same problem as attempting to direct the economy with socialism—central authorities dictate outcomes without knowing what the outcomes should be or how they are best achieved.

The Perverse Popularity of Command and Control

How Industry Is Protected against Competition at the Expense of the Environment

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Most government attempts to protect the environment involve imposing detailed regulations on how, and how much, pollution must be reduced. This command-and-control approach does reduce pollution, but as I explained last month, it does so at high cost.

The High Cost of Command and Control

The EPA Misses Opportunities for Low-Cost Pollution Control

AUGUST 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

We may not all agree on how much pollution to reduce, but we certainly should agree to reduce it as cheaply as possible. Since cleaning up at least cost is exactly the same as maximizing the cleanup for any given cost, cost minimization should appeal even to those who dislike thinking about the cost of protecting the environment.

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CURRENT ISSUE

October 2014

Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
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