Freeman

October 1966

Volume 16, 1966

FEATURES

Set My People Free

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by EDWARD Y. BREESE

Ones practice of freedom may be hindered by others, but there isnt any way to be free without doing it yourself

The Case of the Free Rider

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by PETER A. FARRELL

Peter Farrell finds occasion, in the rash of strikes among transport workers, to re-examine the case of the free rider.

The Cost of Living

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by PAUL L. POIROT

The cost of living tends to rise in proportion to the extent that we let government lead our lives.

The Supremacy of the Market

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by LUDWIG VON MISES

Dr. Mises offers some further thoughts on the wages of union violence in a timely selection from an earlier study.

Men of Prey

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by LEONARD E. READ

Leonard Read follows with his own interpretation of the causes and consequences of the predatory actions of some persons against others.

The Freeman Asks, "Why Compromise?"

OCTOBER 01, 1966

A cartoon from Punch calls for a contrary view of the uses and abuses of compromise.

25. Political Experimentation: The Four-Year Plans

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

In approaching the conclusion of his series on The Flight from Reality, Dr. Carson finds in Presidential 4-year plans some startling departures from the American tradition.

Canute and the Counting of Noses

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by WILLARD M. FOX

A market research specialist points up some of the pitfalls of basing political action on the results of opinion polls.

Visit With a Headmaster

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by TIMOTHY J. WHEELER

Timothy Wheeler finds something new in educational procedures and results when he visits the Academy of Basic Education, near Milwaukee.

The First Liberty Library

OCTOBER 01, 1966 by MURRAY N. ROTHBARD

Who was Thomas Hollis? Murray Rothbard reminds us of the important role Hollis played in establishing liberty in America.

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Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
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