Freeman

May 2014

Volume 64, 2014

There are as many routes to our movement—and to loving liberty—as there are people to take them. While those who focus on doctrinal purity have their place, what matters most is bringing in as many people as possible, and building a vast, multifaceted movement with room for all. In this issue, Max Borders describes this open, varied libertarianism. We continue our interview with Anne Wortham, whose experiences remind us of how much identity politics still plagues the academy. Plus UAW desperation, something you didn't know about Bitcoin and much, much more. 


FEATURES

The UAW Against the Volunteer State

Labor politics is desperate, thanks to capital mobility

MARCH 28, 2014 by WENDY MCELROY

Labor union dynamics are changing; a recent vote at a Volkswagen plant struck a blow against the UAW's strategy to adapt.

The State as a Metanarrative

How the postmodern critique can augment the libertarian one

MARCH 31, 2014 by CASEY GIVEN

Most people don't see postmodernism and libertarianism as sharing much in common. But libertarians can learn a thing or two from postmodernism's analysis--and even deconstruction--of metanarratives.

Zoned Out

Why and how we should seek to restore a free market in land

MARCH 18, 2014 by NATHAN SMITH

Zoning laws bring ordinary people into contact with government perversity. A free land market would improve our wealth, well-being, and environment.

Selling Envy

How governments promote the worst in us to redistribute wealth

APRIL 02, 2014 by TERREE P. SUMMER

When politicians worry about inequality, they're trying to leverage one of our lesser impulses into power. The only equality it produces is equal poverty for non-elites.

Chasing Dystopian Rainbows

It seems scientism passes for science these days

APRIL 08, 2014 by STEWART DOMPE, ADAM C. SMITH

A NASA report has more to say about using the correct analytical tools than it does about inequality.

Frank Woolworth and the Minimum Wage

APRIL 07, 2014 by DANIEL J. SMITH, ZAC THOMPSON

Frank Woolworth wound up benefiting millions of consumers and employees. Minimum-wage laws would have made it all impossible.

The Economist Who Said Maybe

The answer to most economic questions begins with “I don’t know”

MARCH 21, 2014 by MICHAEL CLARK

Humility is the most crucial lesson of economics; the power of spontaneous order in the market always outpaces what any individual can imagine.

The Individualist - Part 2: An Interview with Anne Wortham

APRIL 09, 2014 by THE FREEMAN

The first part of our interview with Anne Wortham made waves. In this second part, we go deeper into her experiences in higher education.


COLUMNS

Libertarian Holism

MARCH 26, 2014 by MAX BORDERS

We are only effective to the degree that we can grow our ranks, lock our arms, and build our free world in parallel with the crumbling power hierarchies of the twentieth century.

The Austrian Influences on Bitcoin

There is a bit of Menger, Mises, Hayek, Rothbard, and Kirzner in every Satoshi

MARCH 25, 2014 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Bitcoin seems fantastic, but it has made real what, for more than a century, Austrian economists described in theory. Here's a primer.

Enemy of the State, Friend of Liberty

MARCH 17, 2014 by LAWRENCE W. REED

Cicero almost single-handedly staved off the destruction of the Roman Republic, even in the face of assured destruction. That makes him a hero.

Hating Politics, Loving Government

Politics is inseparable from government

APRIL 03, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

Politics is the domestic counterpart to empire building: Both seek a monopoly on the use of violent force.

Nigeria’s Moment

A visit to a West African nation reveals tragic failure, yet great potential

MARCH 24, 2014 by DOUG BANDOW

Nigeria is full of ambitious, industrious people held back by State corruption and violent internal divisions.



Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

October 2014

Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION