Freeman

May 1994

Volume 44, 1994

FEATURES

Perspective

JANUARY 01, 2003 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Lodge Doctors and the Poor

Organized Medicine Destroyed the Vibrant Health-Care Alternative of Lodge Practice

MAY 01, 1994 by DAVID BEITO

A Feminist Lesson From Economics

Legislative Mandates Won't Change the Social Order

MAY 01, 1994 by DEBORAH WALKER

The Incredible Ticket Machine

Economic Progress Depends on Entrepreneurial Discovery

MAY 01, 1994 by JERRY ELLIG

As Values Collapse, Government Grows

Restoring America's Foundational Values Ought to Be a Top Priority

MAY 01, 1994 by LAWRENCE W. REED

"I can't possibly impose my values on you," Kidder said the teachers and administrators seemed to be saying. Even more incredibly, when he told this story "in the company of about seven very bright college juniors and seniors sitting around a dinner table at a very good liberal arts college in California," every single one said those teachers and administrators were absolutely right. This is worse than situational ethics; it's just no ethics at all.

The Moral Consequences of Paternalism

Should Government Protect Us from Our Vices?

MAY 01, 1994 by DANIEL KLEIN

Paternalism denies people the liberty necessary to develop dignity as well as the kind of willful, puposive action that makes life meaningful, rather than just a collection of happenings.

The Past Is Prologue

Government Interventions Make Home Ownership Less Affordable

MAY 01, 1994 by K. MAUREEN HEATON

King Charles' Ax: Property Rights, Human Freedom, and The Quality of Life

Only a Free-Market Society Respects Individuals

MAY 01, 1994 by JOHN ROBSON

Owls, Ferrets, And Free Markets

The Endangered Species Act Creates Perverse Incentives

MAY 01, 1994 by K. L. BILLINGSLEY

Post-Communist Traumas East and West

Recovering from Soviet Terror Is Not Easy

MAY 01, 1994 by TIBOR R. MACHAN
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