Freeman

March 2004

Volume 54, 2004

FEATURES

F. A. Hayek and The Road to Serfdom: A Sixtieth-Anniversary Appreciation

Hayek's Work Stemmed the Tide Toward Totalitarian Collectivism

MARCH 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

The Collectivist Paradox

Collectivist Systems Require One Individual to Make Key Decisions

MARCH 01, 2004 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Decency Requires a Minimum-Wage Law?

Proponents of Minimum-Wage Laws Commit Logical, Economic and Moral Fallacies

MARCH 01, 2004 by AEON SKOBLE

The Defense of Our Civilization Against Intellectual Error

Harmful Teachings Are Often Inspired by Very Noble Ideals

MARCH 01, 2004 by F. A. HAYEK

The Awesome Powers of Government

The Contrast Between Government and Business Power Is Striking

MARCH 01, 2004 by MURRAY WEIDENBAUM

The New World of Blogs

Blogs Provide a Universe of Experts on Every Imaginable Topic

MARCH 01, 2004 by TYLER COWEN

A Museum You Don't Want to Miss

Communism's Terrible Record Must be Documented and Displayed

MARCH 01, 2004 by LAWRENCE W. REED

More than 150 years ago Karl Marx predicted that communism was inevitable. History, he claimed, was marching inexorably toward a communist paradise. In hindsight it would appear that if anything about communism was inevitable, it was that it would sooner or later be relegated to the status of museum relic. In the capital city of a formerly communist country in eastern Europe, that's exactly what has happened.

Westerns and Property Rights

Private Property Rights Allow Peaceful Coexistence of Competing Land Uses

MARCH 01, 2004 by ANDREW P. MORRISS

Watering the Tree

Doting Too Much on the Weak Creates Helplessness

MARCH 01, 2004 by RUSSELL MADDEN
1  2 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION