Freeman

January 1967

Volume 17, 1967

FEATURES

Socialism in Saskatchewan

JANUARY 01, 1967 by W. ROSS THATCHER

Premier W. Ross Thatcher of Saskatchewan describes the unscrambling of twenty years of socialism in that province.

Don

JANUARY 01, 1967 by JOHN C. SPARKS

The best we can do for the rookies, suggests John Sparks, is to let them earn their way.

Right Premise

JANUARY 01, 1967 by LAWRENCE FERTIG

Though none can accurately time the economic crisis that inflation breeds, Lawrence Fertig predicts with certainty that freedom will be lost in the process.

Can Food Supply Keep Pace With Population Growth

JANUARY 01, 1967 by KARL BRANDT

Internationally famed economist, Karl Brandt, shows that food supply can outpace population growth if coercive controls are avoided.

The Castle of the Bulletin Board

JANUARY 01, 1967 by GORDON BLEIL

A company bulletin board affords a study in miniature of the way the market works

Controlling HCL

JANUARY 01, 1967 by W. A PATON

It's not so much the Cost of Living as the minor regulations and controls that prove so irritating to Dr. W. A. Paton.

Leonard E. Read

JANUARY 01, 1967

Leonard Read finds in current Post Office jams a further argument for getting government out of our business affairs.

Bureaucratic Blight

JANUARY 01, 1967 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

Give us relief, pleads William Henry Chamberlin, from the "multitude of New Offices [and] swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance."

Let

JANUARY 01, 1967 by ROBERT M. THORNTON

Until a man has his own house in order, it ill behooves him to worry for the whole world.

American Federalism: History

JANUARY 01, 1967 by GEORGE CHARLES ROCHE III

Dr. Roche reviews in this issue the historical record of Federalism in the United States of America.

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