Freeman

January 1964

Volume 14, 1964

FEATURES

Play Store Economics

JANUARY 01, 1964 by DEAN RUSSELL

When youngsters play store, their pricing policy resembles that of the master planners in socialist societies - they have no actual market to reflect supply-demand situations and give meaningful prices.

Big Wars From Little Errors Grow

JANUARY 01, 1964 by E.W. DYKES

The way to start a war, thinks Bill Dykes, is to mind someone else's business; so perhaps the way to peace with one's neighbor is to try leaving him alone.

The Greatest Family in History

JANUARY 01, 1964 by FRED DEARMOND

The Medici tried that, in fifteenth century Florence, with results unmatched in history. They set an example that survives after 500 years.

The UN Threat to the US

JANUARY 01, 1964 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

Could Lorenzo the Magnificent have functioned as well through a United Nations Organization? William Henry Chamberlin has some reasonable doubts.

Jobs Require Capital

JANUARY 01, 1964 by W. M. CURTISS

A taxi driver needs capital, too, though the price of a medallion is hardly a full-fledged free-market determination.

The American Tradition: 10. Of the Civilizing of Groups

JANUARY 01, 1964 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Professor Carson finds that Americans have forgotten some of the ways successfully used in the past to help civilize renegade groups and mobs.

A Letter to the President

JANUARY 01, 1964 by PAUL JOHNSON

A young man in Texas has fun imagining how he'd "get his fair share" if he were a river-boat captain.

DATA: A New Type of Give-Away Program

JANUARY 01, 1964 by ORIEN JOHNSON

Orien Johnson relates his experiences in a new approach to the problems of undeveloped peoples and foreign aid.

Professor Hutt on Keynesianism

JANUARY 01, 1964 by LUDWIG VON MISES

That the fallacies of the "new economics" can be understood and explained by a man from South Africa should afford hope for Americans.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1964/1

JANUARY 01, 1964 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


John Chamberlain points out some wrong reasons used by Edmund Wilson when he wrote "The Cold War" and "The Income Tax: A Protest."

Ed Opitz offers some helpful suggestions for further readings in the field of general philosophy.


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It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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