Freeman

February 1967

Volume 17, 1967

FEATURES

Domestic Inflation Versus International Solvency

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by GARY NORTH

A serious problem, suggests Gary North, stems from the fact that a policy of domestic inflation results in an irredeemable money unacceptable for settling balances due in international trade.

How Should Prices Be Determined?

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by HENRY HAZLITT

Henry Hazlitt further pursues the monetary question through the implications of price controls, antitrust policies, and other interventions, to the conclusion that an unhampered market best finds the right price.

The Bait & The Hook

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Some fishermen may be surprised to discover, with Professor Carson's help, that men, too, can be baited and hooked on promises of something for nothing.

Prophets, Jurists, and Property

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by WILLIAM J. PALMER

Judge William Palmer, long devoted to the defense of property as the key to human rights, traces the history of private property over the centuries and points up the seriousness of modern invasions of privacy.

The Press and Peoples Right to Know

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by JOHN C. MERRILL

Is it the duty of the government to reveal, or the obligation of citizens to find out and understand, what the governors are doing to the governed?

American Federalism: Erosion

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by GEORGE CHARLES ROCHE III

In this third article of his series on American Federalism, Dr. Roche identifies a number of today's most devastating departures from the basic principles and design.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1967/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1967 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


Losing has its merits, suggests John Chamberlain as he reviews William Buckley's "The Unmaking of a Mayor."

And George Roche finds worthy of note "The Fabian Way" and "The Democrat's Dilemma."


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