Freeman

December 2007

Volume 57, 2007

FEATURES

Bad Policy Drives Out Good

AUGUST 24, 2007 by SHELDON RICHMAN

All public policies are related. Okay, that may be a slight overstatement, but there's a point here. A politician's credibility on one public issue -- and thus the disposition of that issue -- will often be determined by his or her position on other issues. People will look at a politician's full program as a way of judging good faith. Case in point: the Bush administration's announcement that it will limit the states' ability to extend medical coverage through the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) to families that do not qualify for poverty programs because they make too much money.

Uneven Information Causes Market Failure?

Market-Failure Arguments Ignore Incentives for Market Participants to Overcome Assymetric Information

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by JOSHUA C. HALL

Book Reviews - December 2007

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by GEORGE C. LEEF

  • Who Controls the Internet? Illusions of a Borderless World
    by Jack Goldsmith and Tim Wu Reviewed by Andrew P. Morriss
  • Econospinning: How to Read Between the Lines When the Media Manipulate the Numbers
    by Gene Epstein Reviewed by Joseph Coletti
  • The Entrepreneurial Imperative: How Americas Economic Miracle Will Reshape the World (and Change Your Life)
    by Carl J. Schramm Reviewed by Frederic Sautet
  • The Green Wave: Environmentalism and Its Consequences
    by Bonner Cohen Reviewed by George C. Leef

Index 2007

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by BETH HOFFMAN

Casualties of the War on Poverty

The Truth about the U.S. Poverty Rate

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE

The Fear of Free Trade

Addressing Protectionists' Fear of Job Loss

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by MARK W. HENDRICKSON

Immigration Control, Circa AD 175

A Lesson from Ancient Greece on Illegal Immigrants and Employment

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by HAROLD B. JONES JR.

In Praise of an Uncommon Woman

School-Choice Entrepreneur Alberta Wilson and the Faith First Educational Assistance Corporation

DECEMBER 01, 2007 by LAWRENCE W. REED
1  2 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION