Freeman

August 1971

Volume 21, 1971

FEATURES

The Founding of the American Republic:1. The American Epic-1760-1800

AUGUST 01, 1971 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Introducing a series on the unique American experiment in freedom under limited government.

Buying Up Surpluses

AUGUST 01, 1971 by GEORGE HAGEDORN

Pricing goods or services out of the market always raises the problem of what to do about the "surplus."

IMF: World Inflation Factory

AUGUST 01, 1971 by HENRY HAZLITT

The trouble with the Idea of an International Monetary Fund in 1949 is still the trouble in 1971.

Root of All Evil

AUGUST 01, 1971 by ROBERT G. ANDERSON

Concerning the nature and depth of the causes of inflation and the prospects of a cure.

The Disaster Lobby

AUGUST 01, 1971 by THOMAS R. SHEPARD JR.

The greatest danger we face is from those who would save us from ourselves.

Who Pays for Clean Air and Water?

AUGUST 01, 1971 by FRANCIS ASPINWALL

In the market economy, competition obliges producers to supply what consumers most want.

Ownership and Freedom

AUGUST 01, 1971 by DEAN RUSSELL

Private property is the foundation upon which all freedoms rest.

Two Ways to Slavery

AUGUST 01, 1971 by JAMES M. ROGERS

When delegating power and authority to "good" men, remember that the power is apt to be inherited by "bad" men.

Early Warning

AUGUST 01, 1971 by NASSAU SENIOR

A mid-nineteenth century analysis of the evil consequences of government "charity."

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1971/8

AUGUST 01, 1971 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Frederic Bastiat: A Man Alone" by George Charles Roche III


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