Freeman

April 1978

Volume 28, 1978

FEATURES

Guilt, Responsibility and Western Prosperity

APRIL 01, 1978 by CHARLES DYKES

A rising standard of living hinges on the elevation of spiritual, moral and educational standards.

The Hidden Costs of Free Lunches

APRIL 01, 1978 by GARY NORTH

Free lunches, if legislated, are devastatingly expensive to the recipients.

Living Together

APRIL 01, 1978 by ROGER DONWAY

Concerning the bonds of sociability underlying the concept of laissez faire.

The Farm Strike: Will It Do More Harm than Good?

APRIL 01, 1978 by LELAND P. CADE

Is a cost-price squeeze sufficient reason to repeal the law of supply and demand?

Levels of Discussion

APRIL 01, 1978 by HANS SENNHOLZ

All ideas must be submitted to the test of free discussion which is a reliable friend of truth.

Is the Free Market Ethical?

APRIL 01, 1978 by FRED E. FOLDVARY

A market free of coercion is on firm moral ground.

World in the Grip of an Idea: 16. Sweden: The Paternal State

APRIL 01, 1978 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The curious notion of the paternal state could hardly have come from a careful study of history.

What Price Control Really Means

APRIL 01, 1978 by LAWRENCE W. REED

The history of price control is the history of shortages, queues, and dissatisfied customers.

Constitutional Restraints on Power

APRIL 01, 1978 by EDMUND OPITZ

Government is the power structure that free men are obliged to restrain.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1978/4

APRIL 01, 1978 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Beyond Failure: How to Cure a Neurotic Society" by Frank Goble "A Critique of Interventionism" by Ludwig von Mises

"Notes and Recollections" by Ludwig von Mises

"On the Manipulation of Money and Credit" by Ludwig von Mises

"It's No Sin To Be Rich: A Defense ofCapitalism" by William Davis

"The People Shapers" by Vance Packard


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It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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