Freeman

ANYTHING PEACEFUL

Students in St. Louis Learned How to “Free the World”

JULY 25, 2013 by SARA MORRISON

Last week, FEE finished its second high school seminar of the summer, “Free the World,” which examined the Economic Freedom of the World Index and its five main components: Size of Government, Rule of Law/Property Rights, Sound Money, Freedom to Trade, and Regulation. Students from Seattle, Orlando, Bellflower, Ca., and 16 states traveled to the seminar held at Saint Louis University. The seminar’s 72 attendees were treated to a spectacular lineup of faculty, including FEE alumnus Chris Coyne who opened the seminar with an introduction to economic ideas.   

Joining Coyne were fellow staff members at the Mercatus Center, Matt Mitchell and Patrick McLaughlin. Mitchell led students through a mock voting process to demonstrate the transitive fallacy during his lecture on public choice, and McLaughlin illustrated the trend of growth in both the size of government and the number of regulations. Brennan Brown of the Charles Koch Foundation taught students the role of property rights in a free society as well as the importance of trade. Participants left the seminar aware of the clear link between economic freedom and prosperity and with an inspiring energy to fight for a free country.

Every participant looking to stay connected with their peers as well as advance their study of what a free society looks like is invited to join the FEE Alumni Network.

ABOUT

SARA MORRISON

Sara Morrison is the Program Operations Manager at FEE.

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