Freeman

ARTICLE

No Eggs, No Omelet

JULY 01, 1976 by TOM ELKINS

From an editorial of April 5, 1976, by TOM ELKINS, Manager, KNUI Radio, Kahului, Hawaii

In order for me to eat an omelet, some chickens have to lay some eggs. If there are no eggs, there can be no omelet . . . and I might have to be satisfied with cereal. That might hurt my feelings, but that can’t be helped. Sooner or later, reality has a way of assert­ing itself. In our complex economic system, it frequently happens later . . . but it happens, nonetheless. Those who claim that they have a right to be non-productive because others are non-produc­tive, too, are ignoring the basic fact that everything that is con­sumed must be produced by somebody. And anything that ex­pands the number of non-producers, or the amount they consume, puts an extra burden on the producers. It can’t be any other way.

 

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July 1976

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