Freeman

Arena Archive

Voting Advances Liberty / Voting Does Not Advance Liberty

Does voting advance liberty? Read the arguments below and decide.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both articles and choose the one that makes the best case. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Single vs. Plural Moral Foundations

Do you believe a free order is justified by one single moral justification or by a number of different moral justifications? Who makes the most compelling argument below?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both articles and choose the one that makes the best case. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Natural Rights: Spooner v. Bentham

Which way do you lean on natural rights? Who do you find yourself agreeing with most often, Spooner or Bentham?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both quotes and choose the one that aligns with your opinion of what makes for good economics. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Which Way Do You Lean on Economic Theory?

Which way do you lean on economic theory? Whose approach do you find yourself taking more often, Mises's or Friedman's?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both quotes and choose the one that aligns with your opinion of what makes for good economics. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Bitcoin's Prospects: Bane or Boon?

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is bitcoin. Daniel Bier explains why he is skeptical about the prospects for bitcoin, while Sam Patterson explains why he is hopeful.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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A Question of Privilege

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is privilege. Cathy Reisenwitz argues that libertarians should be more concerned about issues of class and privilege, while Julie Borowski argues that libertarians should stay focused on individual rights.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

Want to hear about more debates from FEE? Join our email list or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Do Natural Rights Exist?

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is natural rights. Tibor Machan argues that natural rights come from human nature, while Brad Taylor argues that natural rights do not exist at all.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

Want to hear about more debates from FEE? Join our email list or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Future of Higher Education

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is the future of higher education. Michael Gibson argues that higher ed will transform fundamentally in the next 20 years, while Peter Boettke argues that it will not.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

Want to hear about more debates from FEE? Join our email list or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Fourteenth Amendment

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the proposition is "The Fourteenth Amendment Makes America Freer." Clark Neily will be arguing for the proposition. Allen Mendenhall will be arguing against the proposition.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

Want to hear about more debates from FEE? Join our email list or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Staff Edition: Shaping Society

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, we have a special FEE staff edition of The Arena. The topic: Which is more powerful in shaping society, personal character or the legal-political environment? Our president Lawrence Reed will argue for personal character, and our editor Max Borders will argue for the legal-political environment.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

FEE's mission is to inspire, educate, and connect future leaders with the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society. Since 1946, FEE has been the home to explore the ideas of liberty, anything that's peaceful. Keep on top of our debates, articles, and events for students by joining our monthly email list or following us on Facebook and Twitter.

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CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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