Are We Good Enough for Liberty? Giveaway

FEE has yet another new product to offer, absolutely free, as part of the Blinking Lights Project. FEE president Lawrence Reed's new book Are We Good Enough for Liberty? is now available for order in quantities of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 for absolutely free. We only ask that you read it and share it with your friends, neighbors, family members, and fellow students. We want to give this book as wide a distribution as possible and you can help us with that task. 
 
Reed's book establishes the indispensable connection between liberty and character and explains why, throughout history, "no people who lost their character kept their liberty." It is a book of stories and lessons from the past and from across the world. It instructs as well, noting that "If you do not govern yourself, you will be governed." These are lessons which FEE places in all of its educational programs: in the Freeman, the summer seminars, our online resources, and now distilled down to one book for you to take.
 
Please be patient with us as we transition our shipping services from New York to Atlanta. Your orders may experience delays as we move. Thank you.



 

Are We Good Enough for Liberty?

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At this time, shipping is only available to the U.S. and Canada.  We apologize for the inconvenience. 

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Are We Good Enough for Liberty?




 

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CURRENT ISSUE

October 2014

Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
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Biddle v. Borders on Moral Foundations

Do you believe a free order is justified by one single moral justification or by a number of different moral justifications?