NEWS

Nominations for the 2011 FEE Prizes in Austrian Economics

AUGUST 22, 2011 by TSVETELIN M. TSONEVSKI

The Society for the Development of Austrian Economics (SDAE) is pleased to announce that nominations are now open for the 2011 Foundation for Economic Education Prizes for the best book and the best article recently published in Austrian economics.

The following conditions apply:

1. Authors nominated must be members in good standing with the SDAE (check the Society’s website for information on how to join).

2. The books and articles nominated must have been published between January 1, 2009 and August 31, 2011.

3. Nominated articles should be emailed as an attachment or as a URL to the article to Chris Coyne – ccoyne3@gmu.edu

4. Nominations for the book prize should include the title and all other relevant information (publisher, date of publication, ISBN #) and be sent to the above email address. Those nominating books need not send copies. Edited volumes and short monographs are not eligible for the award.

5. All nominations must be received by Chris Coyne no later than October 15, 2011.

6. Self-nominations will not be accepted.

Each prize comes with a cash award of $500 thanks to the generous support of the Foundation for Economic Education. Recipients will be required to submit a short blog post on their winning book or article for posting on the FEE website.

Winners will be announced at the annual banquet of the SDAE, this year in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the Southern Economic Association meetings from November 19-21, 2011. The SDAE dinner will be held on Sunday, November 20.

Questions may be directed to Chris Coyne at ccoyne3@gmu.edu

Chris Coyne
SDAE Vice President

ABOUT

TSVETELIN M. TSONEVSKI

Tsvetelin Tsonevski is director of academic affairs at FEE. He holds an LL.M. degree in Law and Economics from George Mason School of Law.

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