NEWS

Federal Reserve Essay Contest

OCTOBER 06, 2011 by BRIAN AITKEN

The Foundation for Economic Education is proud to announce the 2011 Eugene S. Thorpe Writing Competition.

Writers of all ages are invited to address the following:
“Should the Federal Reserve be abolished? What monetary system should replace it?”

Deadline: Midnight, Dec. 31, 2011
Length: 2,000 words. No footnotes or endnotes.
Email Word file to: essaycontest@fee.org
(One entry only.)

The winner will be awarded $2,000 and have his or her essay published in The Freeman.

Eligibility: The Eugene S. Thorpe Writing Competition is open to writers from around the world, including students, freelance writers, teachers and professors, and business professionals. There is no minimum or maximum age for entrants. FEE employees (and their immediate family members), trustees, and Freeman editors and columnists are not eligible.

Eugene Stephenson Thorpe (1913–2001) was born in Elroy, Wisconsin, and graduated from Cornell University with a degree in civil engineering. An early critic of FDR and the changes his policies made in the fabric of American life, Mr. Thorpe’s core beliefs included hard work, free trade, small government, and self-reliance.  He was a longtime supporter of the Foundation for Economic Education and a devoted reader of The Freeman. His children have fittingly established the Eugene S. Thorpe Award as a tribute to his life and ideas.

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