MULTIMEDIA

A Republic--If We Can Keep It

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by BURTON FOLSOM, LAWRENCE W. REED

A collection of essays by FEE President Lawrence W. Reed and historian Burton W. Folsom, Jr. that surveys the economic history of the United States and the modern world. Along the way, they dismiss commonly-held fallacies and present the stories of the individuals who changed history and expanded liberty for everyone.

Buy the Paperback here: https://www.createspace.com/3730352

Buy the Kindle version here: http://www.amazon.com/Republic--If-We-Can-Keep-ebook/dp/B00

 

ABOUT

BURTON FOLSOM

Burton Folsom, Jr. is a professor of history at Hillsdale College and author (with his wife, Anita) of FDR Goes to War.

ABOUT

LAWRENCE W. REED

Lawrence W. (“Larry”) Reed became president of FEE in 2008 after serving as chairman of its board of trustees in the 1990s and both writing and speaking for FEE since the late 1970s. Prior to becoming FEE’s president, he served for 20 years as president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Midland, Michigan. He also taught economics full-time from 1977 to 1984 at Northwood University in Michigan and chaired its department of economics from 1982 to 1984.

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