Freeman

September 2013

Volume 63, 2013

Taking on the State directly isn’t a very promising strategy—but hacking it might be. In essence, “hacking” refers to finding better ways to do things, especially through workarounds that allow us to go over or around the obstacles of the State, which quickly become encrusted with entrenched interests. In this issue, John Robb discusses how this might work; Tom Bell says we might start finding out sooner rather than later, thanks to some determined entrepreneurs in Honduras. Zachary Caceres explains how governance is a form of technology and how it might be improved, while Tomasz Kaye takes a look at three new technologies for connecting people directly to each other. And much, much more. 


FEATURES

Are National Hierarchies Becoming Obsolete?

An Interview with John Robb

AUGUST 06, 2013 by THE FREEMAN

Technology is changing and so will the methods of organizing life.

Agorism’s Tech Triumvirate

Anything Peaceful in the Counter-Economy

JUNE 14, 2013 by TOMASZ KAYE

New technologies are opening new routes around the State, helping connect both protesters in Turkey and anyone who isn't crazy about having the NSA reading over their shoulders.

Hacking Law and Governance with Startup Cities

How Innovation Can Fix Our Social Tech

JULY 09, 2013 by ZACHARY CACERES

Business and technology behemoths get overturned by innovators all the time, but Leviathan's long overdue for a shake-up. Startup cities offer a way to start experimenting with governance and find better ways to do things.

Do Markets Promote Immoral Behavior?

JUNE 17, 2013 by FRED E. FOLDVARY

Critics of free markets confuse the effects of government interventions with the fundamental activity of markets, then claim the latter encourage unethical behavior.

Worshipping the Wrong Goddess

Democracy and Liberty Don't Necessarily Go Together

JULY 22, 2013 by B.K. MARCUS

The Chinese students crushed in Tiananmen Square had the same division as American revolutionaries: Some wanted freedom from coercive government, while others simply wanted to take their rulers' seats.

Unionizing Nanny

What’s Wrong with Domestic Workers’ “Bill(s) of Rights”

JULY 08, 2013 by WENDY MCELROY

The push to create "bills of rights" for nannies benefits governments, unions, and large health-care institutions--not disadvantaged workers, children, the elderly, or taxpayers.

Micro over Macro

Unemployment Benefits Are Prolonging the Pain

JUNE 26, 2013 by D.W. MACKENZIE

A little-used measure of unemployment and job vacancies suggests why unemployment remains stubbornly high.


COLUMNS

Hacking Leviathan

SEPTEMBER 03, 2013 by THE FREEMAN

The same system that saddled us with Leviathan is unlikely to liberate us from it any time soon. We have to come up with workarounds on our own. Hacking Leviathan--that is, coming up with clever, peaceful, voluntary ways around the State's roadblocks--constricts the State's predations in actual fact while the Beltway types bloviate and cut back-room deals.

Startup City Redux

Honduras: from RED to ZEDE to … Freedom?

JUNE 27, 2013 by TOM W. BELL

Despite the Honduran Supreme Court's rejection of RED startup cities, the reformers are back. Honduras may have just created the world's freest municipalities.

The Character of Edward Snowden

JUNE 11, 2013 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Edward Snowden heroically gave up a comfortable life to expose the machinery of oppression under which we all live.

The Limits of the Non-Aggression Principle

JUNE 07, 2013 by SANDY IKEDA

The non-aggression principle relies on a common understanding of the relevant property-rights regime; otherwise, it cannot address complex and subtle rights disputes.

Wonk Licensing

Time for Washington to Create a Policy Support Program

JULY 11, 2013 by DOUG BANDOW

Washington is awash in bad policy, but only Washington can institute the kind of licensing-and-subsidy regime that could solve the problem for good.


CULTURE

The Eyes Watching You

1984 and the Surveillance State

JUNE 13, 2013 by SARAH SKWIRE

We'd better hope we're living under a Kafkaesque regime rather than an Orwellian one. In the former, incompetence provides a little space for a life to be lived. In the latter, there is no private space, there are no innocents, and the surveillance State never makes mistakes.

The New War Between the States

Fate of the States: The New Geography of American Prosperity

JULY 15, 2013 by DOUGLAS FRENCH

Economic power followed the population to the coasts and the sand states during the boom. In the wake of the bust and interventions along the coasts, "flyover country" is becoming the source of America's economic growth.

On the Road Again

Customize Your Life with Location Independence

JULY 31, 2013 by MICHAEL NOLAN

Working from wherever you want to be isn't necessarily easy, but taking your happiness into your own hands never is. In exchange for the risk, you get to step away from the forms of bondage--especially to distant, maybe unattainable dreams--that most of us experience on a daily basis.

Victoria Woodhull Learns to Speak

AUGUST 05, 2013 by MALAIKA KING ALBRECHT

How odd that you prefer
Spirits talking
over a woman alone on a stage.

Tremolando

AUGUST 16, 2013 by CLAIRE BATEMAN

Everyone's raving about it: the new music
performed only by virtuosos with palsied hands.


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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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