Freeman

October 1993

Volume 43, 1993

FEATURES

The Economic Way of Thinking, Part 1

Economics is the basic study of human action.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by RONALD NASH

Economics is the basic study of human action.

Banking Without Regulation

The historical record sheds light on the possible consequences of completely deregulating banking.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by LAWRENCE H. WHITE

The historical record sheds light on the possible consequences of completely deregulating banking.

Toward a Cashless Society

EFTS is likely to have a profound and visible impact on everyday decision-making.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by ELIZABETH KOLAR

EFTS is likely to have a profound and visible impact on everyday decision-making.

Why Free Markets Are Difficult to Defend

The abundant but diffuse benefits of free markets are difficult to explain.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by D. ERIC SCHANSBERG

The abundant but diffuse benefits of free markets are difficult to explain.

Your Money—Your Choice

ABC ignores the most important public policy problem in a free society.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by E.C. PASOUR

ABC ignores the most important public policy problem in a free society.

The Trouble with Keynes

Focusing on the macro.

APRIL 01, 2009 by ROGER W. GARRISON

Keynesian theory implies an inherent instability in market economies. Thus the theory cannot possibly explain how a healthy market economy functions--how the market process allows one kind of activity to be traded off against the other.

Why Government Can't Create Jobs

It is a fallacy of the Keynesian legacy that government can reduce unemployment.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by MARK AHLSEEN

It is a fallacy of the Keynesian legacy that government can reduce unemployment.

A Life-Saving Lesson from Operation Desert Storm

Conscription artificially suppresses the price of labor relative to capital.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by DONALD BOUDREAUX

Conscription artificially suppresses the price of labor relative to capital.

The Cause of Freedom Begins with Me

We must resolve to honor and defend our neighbor’s freedom as our own.

OCTOBER 01, 1993 by ROGER KOOPMAN

We must resolve to honor and defend our neighbor's freedom as our own.

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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