Freeman

November 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

I Support Coercion and I Vote

Why Donate Your Own Money When You Can Force Taxpayers to Cough It Up?

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by JON SANDERS

Enemies of the Automobile

An Influential Movement Is Underway to Restrict Car Use

NOVEMBER 01, 2001 by RALPH W. CLARK

Freeing the Freeways

Private Industry Could Build and Manage Superior Highways

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by LEIGH JENCO

The Economic Virtues of Federalism

COPS Squanders Society's Resources

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by E. FRANK STEPHENSON, DANIEL L. ALBAN

The Government's Assault on Golf

Should the Courts Set the Rules of Professional Sports?

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by RAYMOND J. KEATING

Constitutional Protection of Economic Liberty

The Supreme Court Seems Oblivious to the Needs of a Free and Flexible Market

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by NORMAN BARRY

Psychiatry in a Communist Utopia

Cuba Uses Psychiatry for Political Purposes

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by MIGUEL A. FARIA JR.

Peanut Butter, Education, and Markets

Who Should Provide Education, and How Should It Be Financed?

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by DARCY ANN OLSEN

How the Theory of Comparative Advantage Saved My Marriage

Economic Theory Has a Down-Home Value

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by TED ROBERTS

The Return to a Global Economy

Is Globalization Today Different from Globalization a Century Ago?

NOVEMBER 01, 2000 by IAN VÁSQUEZ

If we want to understand the current advance of global capitalism, it is worth remembering that a liberal international economic order has actually arisen twice, first at the end of the nineteenth century and now at the end of the twentieth.[1] In many ways, the world economy has simply caught up to where it was 100 years ago, prompting prominent economists to question whether the level of international integration is as high now as it was before the interruptions of two world wars and the Great Depression.

1  2  3 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)