Freeman

November 1966

Volume 16, 1966

FEATURES

The Freedom Nobody Wants

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by EDMUND OPITZ

Our other cherished freedoms, suggests Edmund Opitz, may be of little worth to us if we continue to neglect and deny the freedom of the market.

The Government Veto System

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by LAWRENCE FERTIG

Just how the market is prevented from functioning is spelled out in further detail as Lawrence Fertig describes "The Government Veto System."

In Case of Difference

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by EDWARD LEWIS

If the other fellow is "always right," there may be a need to strengthen one's own convictions.

The Roots of War

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by AYN RAND

Ayn Rand sees the roots of war in the excessive statism and unwarranted use of force in domestic affairs.

The Law of Liberty

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by KENNETH W. SOLLITT

True liberty is found only by doing what we ought because we want to and not because we have to.

The Flight From Reality: 26. Conclusion: The Pen and The Sword

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

Dr. Carson concludes his series on The Flight from Reality with a timely warning to those reformist dreamers who imagine they can combine pen and sword to have their cake and eat it, too.

Protective Taxes and Wages

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by WILLIAM GRAHAM SUMNER

Had he written it today instead of in 1883, William Graham Sumner could not have commented more appropriately on the disastrous consequences of union political practices.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1966/11

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


John Chamberlain makes the most of the literary travelogue through "The Best Times of John Dos Passos."

"The Generosity of Americans" by Arnaud C. Marts is reviewed by Richard Christenson.

Interest Rates Are Rising

NOVEMBER 01, 1966 by HANS SENNHOLZ

For a knowing commentary on the rising trend of prices generally, and interest rates particularly, see Dr. Hans Sennholz.


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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


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No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)