Freeman

November 1964

Volume 14, 1964

FEATURES

When Wishes Become Rights

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by LEONARD E. READ

To have wishes come true, without effort or cost, says Leonard Read, must result in far more harm than good to mankind.

Authority Minus Responsibility

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by JESS RALEY

Jess Raley sees in the so-called race riots the natural consequence of welfare state policies that deny individual responsibility.

Why Speculators

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by PERCY L. GREAVES JR.

There's more than meets the eye to the recent closing of the Cotton Exchange, alleges Percy Greaves, as he shows the vital role of the speculator.

Moonlighting

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by W. M. CURTISS

The more laws there are to limit a man's achievement in a given job, the more he'll turn to "moonlighting" and secondary sources of income.

The Flight From Reality: 2. Symptoms of the Flight

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

In this chapter of his series on "The Flight from Reality," Dr. Carson details some of the outstanding symptoms of the flight as revealed in political actions to resolve economic problems.

Free Speech

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by DEAN RUSSELL

Those who demand free speech, thinks Dean Russell, should be prepared to accept the consequences when they speak out.

What Price Freedom?

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by LEOPOLD SCHWARZSCHILD

A distinguished refugee from Hitler's Germany offers a plea for freedom and a solemn warning to those basking in the illusion that "it can't happen here."

The Road Is Better Than the Inn

NOVEMBER 01, 1964

Those who insist upon beginning to live in tomorrow's utopia face the sad prospect of not living at all.

On Minding Ones Own Business

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by WILLIAM GRAHAM SUMNER

Our old friend, William Graham Sumner, advises once more that a man's great duty to society is to mind his own business.

The Invisible Hand

NOVEMBER 01, 1964 by WYATT B. DURRETTE JR.

A part-time job in college affords a clear example of the compatibility between self-interest and service to others.

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)