Freeman

May 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

The Dangers of Growing Up Comfortable

The Laws of Wealth Creation Are Not Learned Automatically

MAY 01, 2000 by STEVEN YATES

Trust and Privacy on the Net

Most Internet Issues Are Really About Confidentiality

MAY 01, 2000 by DANIEL KLEIN

The Internet and the Death of the Sales Tax

E-Commerce Allows Consumers to "Flee" to Low-Tax States

MAY 01, 2000 by DAVID LABAND, RICHARD W. AULT

Disaster Relief Then and Now

Early Americans Were Self-Reliant

MAY 01, 2000 by JANET SHARP HERMANN

Free Markets and Highest Valued Use

Knowledge Is Never Perfect

MAY 01, 2000 by ROY CORDATO

A Breach of the Public Trust

The Reinterpretation of Statutory Mandates Is a Dangerous Trend

MAY 01, 2000 by M. REED HOPPER

La Lucha: The Human Cost of Economic Repression in Cuba

Cubans Struggle to Make Ends Meet as They Wait for Change

MAY 01, 2000 by PATRICIA LINDERMAN

The Cuyahoga Revisited

What Caused the Cuyahoga River Fire of 1969?

MAY 01, 2000 by STACIE THOMAS

The Starship Private Enterprise

What Should Star Trek's Success and Space Exploration Have in Common?

MAY 01, 2000 by TIMOTHY SANDEFUR

The Common Good Demystified

Does the Common Good Require Coercive Redistribution?

MAY 01, 2000 by EDWARD YOUNKINS
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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)