Freeman

May 1958

Volume 8, 1958

FEATURES

The Human Side of Human Beings: Fountainhead of the Free Economy

MAY 01, 1958 by SIDNEY J. ABELSON

The uniqueness of man is that sooner or later he releases himself from the shackles of an imposed routine and strikes out for new adventures and progress toward some higher goal.

Wages, Unemployment, and Inflation

MAY 01, 1958 by LUDWIG VON MISES

"The wage earner, like every other citizen, is firmly interested in the preservation of the dollar's purchasing power."

The Measure of Success

MAY 01, 1958 by ROBERT H. SIGNOR, ANN SIGNOR

Here's a story of success achieved without benefit of minimum wage legislation or limitation of hours of work or sit-down strikes or price supports or other "privileges," any one of which might have prevented what the Prokupeks have been able to do for themselves through service to others.

Recipe for a Good Meal

MAY 01, 1958 by LEONARD E. READ

There's more to this recipe than gourmets or culinary artists usually talk about, for this salmagundi has a bit of social philosophy in it.

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)