Freeman

March 1999

Volume 49, 1999

FEATURES

To Each His Due

Private Property Institutionalizes Justice

MARCH 01, 1999 by TOM BETHELL

Just Deserts

High Executive Pay Makes Economic Sense

MARCH 01, 1999 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

Crimes of the Mind

Hate-Crime Laws Are Unconstitutional

MARCH 01, 1999 by MELISSA SUAREZ

Mises on Mexico

An Opportunity to Reflect on Mexico's Economic Development

MARCH 01, 1999 by EDUARDO TURRENT

Frontiers: Last, Lost, and Found

Regulation Thwarts Innovation by Making Creativity a Crime

MARCH 01, 1999 by ERIC NOLTE

The Great Bequest

America's Principles of Limited Government Draw on Thousands of Years of History

MARCH 01, 1999 by TOM G. PALMER

The Savings Crisis

Taxation and Welfare Have Eroded Thrift and Self-Reliance

MARCH 01, 1999 by JOHN HOOD

The Bully that Acts Like a Hero

The Actual Purposes of Organizations Are Not Necessarily the Same as Their Stated Purposes

MARCH 01, 1999 by HAROLD B. JONES JR.

Philosophy 1 On 1

The Principles of Classical Liberalism Are Intuitive

MARCH 01, 1999 by JAMES R. OTTESON

Y2K and Entrepreneurial Error

Markets May Be Self-Correcting, but They Are Not All-Seeing

MARCH 01, 1999 by MARK SKOUSEN
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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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