Freeman

June 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

Bastiat's Life

His Literary Works Are a Treasure Trove That Can Still Instruct Readers Today

JUNE 01, 2001 by SHELDON RICHMAN

What Is Seen and What Is Not Seen

MARCH 01, 1974 by BRIAN SUMMERS

If one looks behind government spending, he finds that "you can't get something for nothing."

The Unseen Costs of Disability Laws

The More Capital We Squander Renovating Buildings, the Less We Have to Find Cures for Disabilities

JUNE 01, 2001 by KAREN SELICK

Harmony from Liberty

Bastiat Was There First

JUNE 01, 2001 by NORMAN BARRY

Bastiat: Champion of Economic Liberty

Each New Generation of Advocates of Economic Liberty Has Been Inspired by His Writings

JUNE 01, 2001 by RICHARD EBELING

Frederic Bastiat: The Primacy of Property

The State Must Return to Its Proper Role

JUNE 01, 2001 by JAMES A. DORN

Are There Two Libertarianisms?

Libertarian Moralists and Libertarian Consequentialists Are Not So Different

JUNE 01, 2001 by JAMES PERON

Libertarian, or classical-liberal, thinking is routinely divided into two supposedly different camps. In a controversial article some years ago, R. W. Bradford (using the pen name "Ethan O. Waters") called these "The Two Libertarianisms": "moralism" and "consequentialism." Moralism is the belief that individual rights are justified through an appeal to natural law and natural rights. Consequentialism justifies liberalism by arguing that it will "optimize" the wealth and happiness of society.

Did Deregulation Kill California?

Any State Could Have Experienced a Crisis Like California's

JUNE 01, 2001 by JERRY TAYLOR

Wonders in Perspective

The Free Market Produces Wonders Far More Marvelous and Significant Than NASA Ever Has or Will

JUNE 01, 2001 by DONALD BOUDREAUX

Another Alcoa Executive at Treasury

Will Paul O'Neill Be Another Andrew Mellon?

JUNE 01, 2001 by LAWRENCE W. REED

When President-elect George W. Bush chose Paul H. O'Neill, chairman of the world's largest aluminum manufacturer, to be his secretary of the treasury, Bush said, "it's important for me to find somebody who has vast experience, who has a steady hand, and when he speaks, speaks with authority and conviction and knowledge." If O'Neill turns out to be half as good as the other Alcoa executive who once occupied the same cabinet post, he'll do the country great service.

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Economics in One Lesson (full text)

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There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


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No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)