Freeman

January 1968

Volume 18, 1968

FEATURES

Hello

JANUARY 01, 1968 by JOAN WILKE

A successful saleslady explains the advantages of great expectations.

Commitment, Concern, and Apathy

JANUARY 01, 1968 by W. ALLEN WALLIS

On the other hand, suggests Rochester University's President Wallis, so-called apathetic students often are more constructive than those who act thoughtlessly and irresponsibly.

Pseudo Puppeteers

JANUARY 01, 1968 by LEONARD E. READ

Puppeteering with other people's lives is a dangerous game for everyone involved, counsels Leonard Read.

John Quincy Adams: 1767-1848

JANUARY 01, 1968 by ROBERT M. THORNTON

How would John Quincy Adams rate in the political polls were he to stand for office today?

Liberty and Property: One and Inseparable

JANUARY 01, 1968 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

William Henry Chamberlin examines the vital link between liberty and property and shows that one is meaningless without the other.

To Be Different - and Free

JANUARY 01, 1968 by BEN MOREELL

Another facet of freedom, explains Admiral Moreell, involves the variety that spices our lives.

Politics is Other People's Money

JANUARY 01, 1968 by OLE-JACOB HOFF

They've discovered in Norway that "politics is other people's money."

The Roots of Democracy

JANUARY 01, 1968 by MILTON H. MATER

When asked by some young Turks to explain the case for democracy, Milton Mater finds the key in local government.

Progress Means Change

JANUARY 01, 1968 by LAWRENCE FERTIG

The equality, stability, security we seek from government, declares Lawrence Fertig, may mean an end to progress.

Demand Deposit Inflation

JANUARY 01, 1968 by ANTHONY REINACH

Anthony Reinach tells why we must expect to be taxed by inflation until we learn to curb deficit spending by governments.

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)