Freeman

February 2002

Volume 52, 2002

FEATURES

Can a Feminist Homeschool Her Child?

Leading Feminist Voices Are Silent or Ambivalent about Homeschooling

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by WENDY MCELROY

Time for the Mail Monopoly to Go

There Is Much to Gain from Privatizing the Postal Service

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by SCOTT ESPOSITO

Subsidizing Failure Again . . . And Again, and Again, and Again

Does Amtrak Need More Taxpayer Dollars?

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by SCOTT MCPHERSON

Give Me Your Tired

Do We Really Want Closed Borders?

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by DAVID DORN

Capitalism and Coercion

Why Do So Many People See Coercion Where There Is Free Will?

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by ALLAN LEVITE

Why America Gets Fleeced

Americans Set Themselves Up as Sheep to Be Sheared

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by MELVIN D. BARGER

Energy Economics with Eyes Open

Price Controls Don't Adapt to Change

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by GARY PECQUET, ASHTON J. PECQUET

In Defense of Scalping

What's So Wrong about Ticket Scalping?

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by WILLIAM H. PETERSON

Scapegoating Gun Owners in South Africa

Legally Owned Firearms Are Rarely Used to Commit Crimes

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by JAMES PERON
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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)