Freeman

December 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

How Henry Ford Zapped a Licensing Monopoly

All Ford Wanted Was the Opportunity to Compete Freely in the Market

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MELVIN D. BARGER

Socialized Medicine Is the Problem

Demand Continues to Exceed Supply in Canada's Health Care Market

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by WALTER BLOCK

Wire and Rails: Comparing the Web and Railroads

The Internet Has Little in Common with the Transcontinental Railroads

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by LARRY SCHWEIKART

How War Amplified Federal Power in the Twentieth Century

Wars Have Increased Government Spending, Curtailed Free Speech, and Much, Much More

JULY 01, 1999 by ROBERT HIGGS

No Yahoo! for New Shareholder Plan

"Shareholder Rights" Plans Often Benefit Existing Management while Shortchanging Shareholders

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by GARY M. GALLES

Knut Wicksell: A Sesquicentennial Appreciation

Wicksell's Ideas Have as Much Interest Today as When He First Penned Them

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by RICHARD EBELING

Rolling Back the Market: Economic Dogma and Political Choice by Peter Self

Another Critique of the Free-Market System

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MICHAEL D. MALLINGER

Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men Through Capitalism and Freedom!

Open Markets and Competition Bring Peace and Prosperity

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MARK SKOUSEN

Don't Expect Much From Politics

Where Else Is Such Nonsense Allowed to Flourish?

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by LAWRENCE W. REED

Let Our Allies Defend Themselves

The United States Is Under No Obligation to Put the Interests of Other States or People First

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by DOUG BANDOW
1  2  3 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)