Freeman

August 1964

Volume 14, 1964

FEATURES

How to End Poverty

AUGUST 01, 1964 by DEAN RUSSELL

Dean Russell argues most convincingly that there is a peaceful way to overcome poverty, whereas "war" is reminiscent of the old Marxian "class struggle."

In Defense of Security

AUGUST 01, 1964 by LOIS H. SARGENT

In fact, adds Mrs. Sargent, "were it not for insecurity the human race probably would never have advanced beyond the mentality of the caveman."

A National Policy for Peace

AUGUST 01, 1964 by LUDWIG VON MISES

Wars will not be necessary, Dr. Mises contends, if people will see that economic freedom best serves their own interests.

Nuclear Giants and Ethical Infants

AUGUST 01, 1964 by LEONARD E. READ

There are two types of knowledge, according to Leonard Read, and it is as important to know why as to know how.

Reservation Fever

AUGUST 01, 1964 by R. J. RUSHDOONY

The Reverend R. J. Rushdoony, from his work among American Indians, has seen the difference between a medicine man and a chief.

A Ten Dollar Cadillac

AUGUST 01, 1964 by ROBERT COULSON

A Midwestern statesman pokes fun at the philosophy of something for nothing.

A Trumpet Call To Freedom: Twenty Years After

AUGUST 01, 1964 by WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLAIN

After twenty years, thinks William Henry Chamberlin, Hayek's "The Road to Serfdom" and its plea for liberty remains "the best tract of its kind for the times."

The Public Demands (?)

AUGUST 01, 1964 by EMERSON SCHMIDT

A competent observer and analyst of the Washington scene explodes the myth that growing government intervention is in response to popular demand.

The Right to Pray

AUGUST 01, 1964 by WILLIAM E. CAGE

The "right to pray" becomes a public problem only to the extent that it has to do with tax-supported institutions.

The Curse of Machinery

AUGUST 01, 1964 by HENRY HAZLITT

Henry Hazlitt finds the modern fears of automation remarkably like the reactions to the Industrial Revolution two centuries ago.

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Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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