Freeman

April 2014

Volume 64, 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual—and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us. 


FEATURES

Against Libertarian Brutalism

Will libertarianism be brutalist or humanitarian? Everyone needs to decide.

MARCH 12, 2014 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

As libertarianism gains traction, two strands are competing for mindshare: One asserts individualism come what may; the other celebrates the humane qualities of true liberalism.

Juche: An Unauthorized Interview with Michael Malice

FEBRUARY 19, 2014 by THE FREEMAN

Michael Malice joins us to discuss his latest project, Dear Reader: The Unauthorized Autobiography of Kim Jong Il.

The Crony Gap

Political inequality is the real problem

MARCH 04, 2014 by STEWART DOMPE, ADAM C. SMITH

Most discourse on inequality confuses a constructive form of inequality (economic) with a destructive form (political). Understanding the difference will bring some clarity to the issue.

Elementary School Spiral: A Cautionary Tale

Vouchers are back in vogue, but higher ed offers us lessons about a K–12 tuition spiral

FEBRUARY 24, 2014 by JENNA ROBINSON

Before jumping on board with school vouchers, proponents should hear this cautionary tale from higher education.

Time Machine Poland

Thirty-some years after martial law, Poland is thriving. But life wasn’t always this good. Travel with us to 1981.

FEBRUARY 12, 2014 by GARY DUDNEY

Today Poland is a thriving, vigorous free-market democracy, but things were much different in 1981.

“I Will Never Go Back”

A glimpse into why the Ukrainians did what they did

FEBRUARY 27, 2014 by KARL AND SANDRA BORDEN

Fifteen years after a visit to Ukraine, a FEE supporter reflects upon the words of a physician who swore never again to live without freedom.

Rothbard’s Remedy

Less government means faster healing, says new study

FEBRUARY 18, 2014 by DOUGLAS FRENCH

A new study from Pro Teck Valuation Services provides empirical support for Austrian economists' claims that markets will recover more quickly absent government meddling.

Papal Indulgences and “Impersonal” Markets

Markets might be impersonal, but at least they don’t require coercion

MARCH 03, 2014 by GARY M. GALLES

Some people believe the economy should reflect a particular purpose. Such a pursuit requires the coercion of some by others.


COLUMNS

Today’s Totalitarianism

APRIL 01, 2014 by THE FREEMAN

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan.

A Slogan Worth Your Bumper?

Statism can be summed up and slapped on the back of a car. Can the freedom philosophy?

FEBRUARY 17, 2014 by LAWRENCE W. REED

"Long Run, All People" should be a battle cry of those who embrace liberty.

Passing a Law Won’t Get It Done

FEBRUARY 06, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

Unintended consequences bedevil even the best plans. Passing a law for every outcome you desire only makes it worse.

Watching Mt. Gox Collapse from the Inside

FEBRUARY 28, 2014

The power of a distributed network lies in how decisions are made. There isn't one central point of failure wherein a government regulatory body either makes good law or doesn't.



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CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)