Freeman

April 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

Objectivity and Accountability: A One-Way Street

APRIL 01, 1972 by C HARDESTY

An appeal to public opinion for a better appreciation of the role of business.

The Nature of Modern Warfare

APRIL 01, 1972 by DAVID OSTERFELD

A study of the path to war via domestic welfare programs and departure from the market.

The Economic-Power Syndrome

APRIL 01, 1972 by SYLVESTER PETRO

Exploding the popular myth that business has a coercive power to impose its will upon consumers.

The Ballooning Welfare State

APRIL 01, 1972 by HENRY HAZLITT

The higher the subsidy rate, the greater the number of claimants.

The Founding of the American Republic: 9. Prelude to Independence

APRIL 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

A study in slow motion of the final aggravations that brought separation.

The Federal Reserve System

APRIL 01, 1972 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A descriptive analysis of "the most important tool in the armory of economic interventionism."

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/4

APRIL 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Willmoore Kendall Contra Mundum" edited by Nellie D. Kendall


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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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Economics in One Lesson (full text)

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The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


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There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


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Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


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No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)