Freeman

ARTICLE

Little Jack Horner

AUGUST 01, 1963 by RALPH BRADFORD

Mr. Bradford is a noted speaker, writer, and business organization consultant.

Little Jack Horner sat in a corner,

Eating his Christmas pie;

He stuck in his thumb to pull out a plum

But instead of delighting his friends by reciting

"What a good boy am I,"

He let out a yelp and yammered for help.

 

His happiness perished—was banished;

For the pie that he cherished had vanished,

To float in the air like a brown-sugar moon,

Or a beckoning, orbiting pastry balloon.

 

And he knew with a start that the oversize tart

Was just an illusion. He never had spent

From out of his savings a single red cent

To pay for his pie; and now with his eye

Full of tears, he confronted his moment of truth—

Very painful indeed for so tender a youth,

And painfuller still for his fully-grown brother,

His uncle and aunt, and his father and mother—

That nothing is free; what you get you must buy;

That no one gets fat, however he try,

Or even comes nigh it, who limits his diet

To pie…. in the sky!

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

August 1963

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Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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