Freeman

POETRY

History

MAY 15, 2013 by BRUCE BOND

Back then we put our pennies on the tracks
and waited for the thunder of the boxcars
to pound the Lincoln from their faces, so flat
the mint of it was worthless, priceless, rare.
Those were days the full sun of Los Angeles
crushed us as we thumbed the polished metal
to search for evidence: a god we trust,
a liberty, a date. It takes a god to kill
a god, to have it drummed beneath the thrust
of this world. But as I looked down the rails,
I saw something of another, its parallels
that narrowed as they rose against the heat,
so close they almost met, as a man might meet
the boy he was, faceless in the distance.

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

June 2013

ABOUT

BRUCE BOND

Bruce Bond is the author of nine books of poetry, most recently Choir of the Wells (Etruscan, 2013), The Visible (LSU, 2012), Peal (Etruscan, 2009), and Blind Rain (LSU, 2008). In addition he has two other books forthcoming: The Other Sky(poems in collaboration with the painter Aron Wiesenfeld, Etruscan) and For the Lost Cathedral (LSU). He is a Regents Professor of English at the University of North Texas and Poetry Editor for American Literary Review.

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)