Freeman

POETRY

Duende

JUNE 17, 2014 by DOUG RAMSPECK

Something always
refuses. This is

the solitary hour.
Something makes 

a cloth of the moon
and wears its shroud.

And someone carries
the memory of a lover

in the broken-back
cold. And if always

we imagine experience
as the brutal chord,

we sit before
this window and study

the forensics of the sky.
I was born, we say.

As we retain
hidden in our mouths

one small piece
of God’s tongue

 

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

July/August 2014

ABOUT

DOUG RAMSPECK

Doug Ramspeck is the director of the Writing Center at The Ohio State University at Lima. His most recent collection of poems, Original Bodies, was awarded the Michael Waters Poetry Prize and is forthcoming from Southern Indiana Review Press.

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

Essential Works from FEE

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

By HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!


By FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of liberty for all. Once read and understood, nothing ever looks the same.


By F. A. HAYEK

There can be little doubt that man owes some of his greatest suc­cesses in the past to the fact that he has not been able to control so­cial life.


By JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Leonard Read took the lessons of entrepreneurship with him when he started his ideological venture.


By LEONARD E. READ

No one knows how to make a pencil: Leonard Read's classic (Audio, HTML, and PDF)