Freeman

ARTICLE

Cliches of Socialism

NOVEMBER 01, 1960

 

When a devotee of private property, free market, limited government principles states his position, he is inevitably confronted with a barrage of socialistic cliches. Failure to answer these has effectively silenced many a spokesman for freedom.

The Foundation for Economic Education is preparing a new series entitled

Clichés of Socialism.

These are printed on single 81/2"x 11" sheets. Single copies for the asking. Quantities at 1¢ each. Now ready are suggested answers to the follow­ing clichés:

1. "The more complex the society, the more government control we need.’”

2. "If we had no social security, many people would go hungry."

3. "The government should do for the people what the people are unable to do for themselves.’”

4. "The right to strike is conceded, but…”

5. "Too much government? Just what would you cut out?"

6. "The size of the national debt doesn’t matter because we owe it to ourselves."

7. "Why, you’d take us back to the horse and buggy.”

8. "The free market ignores the poor."

For sample copies (no charge), write to:
The Foundation for Economic Education, Inc., Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y.

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

November 1960

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December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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