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Arena Archive

Good Cops Do Exist / There Are No Good Cops

Are there good cops, or are they all bad? Read the arguments below and decide.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both articles and choose the one that makes the best case. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Voting Advances Liberty / Voting Does Not Advance Liberty

Does voting advance liberty? Read the arguments below and decide.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both articles and choose the one that makes the best case. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Single vs. Plural Moral Foundations

Do you believe a free order is justified by one single moral justification or by a number of different moral justifications? Who makes the most compelling argument below?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both articles and choose the one that makes the best case. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Natural Rights: Spooner v. Bentham

Which way do you lean on natural rights? Who do you find yourself agreeing with most often, Spooner or Bentham?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both quotes and choose the one that aligns with your opinion of what makes for good economics. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Which Way Do You Lean on Economic Theory?

Which way do you lean on economic theory? Whose approach do you find yourself taking more often, Mises's or Friedman's?

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both quotes and choose the one that aligns with your opinion of what makes for good economics. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Bitcoin's Prospects: Bane or Boon?

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is bitcoin. Daniel Bier explains why he is skeptical about the prospects for bitcoin, while Sam Patterson explains why he is hopeful.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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A Question of Privilege

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is privilege. Cathy Reisenwitz argues that libertarians should be more concerned about issues of class and privilege, while Julie Borowski argues that libertarians should stay focused on individual rights.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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Do Natural Rights Exist?

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is natural rights. Tibor Machan argues that natural rights come from human nature, while Brad Taylor argues that natural rights do not exist at all.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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The Future of Higher Education

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the issue is the future of higher education. Michael Gibson argues that higher ed will transform fundamentally in the next 20 years, while Peter Boettke argues that it will not.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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The Fourteenth Amendment

The Arena is a monthly debate feature designed to help readers explore issues of concern to classical liberals/libertarians.

This month, the proposition is "The Fourteenth Amendment Makes America Freer." Clark Neily will be arguing for the proposition. Allen Mendenhall will be arguing against the proposition.

To vote (voting is anonymous), read both columns and choose the strongest argument. Then click on the blue or orange tabs running alongside each argument. After you click on the voting tab, you will register just one time for a "My FEE" account. Once registered, you can easily vote again next month.

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