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Ludwig von Mises

Ludwig von Mises (Sept 29, 1881 – Oct 10, 1973) was  an Austrian School economist and classical liberal. Known for his highly influential magnum opus, Human Action: A Treatise on Economics, Mises explains the science of praxeology which he adopted as his methodological approach to the social sciences. Mises’ ideology significantly contributed to the insurgence of the 20th century libertarian movement in the United States.

Fun Fact: At the age of twelve Ludwig spoke fluent German, Polish, and French, read Latin, and could understand Ukrainian.

To learn more about the tenets of Austrian economics, apply for FEE's People Aren't Pawns summer seminar!

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What Austrian Economics IS and What Austrian Economics Is NOT

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Steve Horwitz, Professor of Economics at St. Lawrence University, explains what Austrian Economics is and what Austrian Economics is not, clearing up some common misconceptions.

This video is based on Steve's essay by the same name:
http://www.coordinationproblem.org/2010/11/what-austrian-economics-is-and-wha...

To learn more about Austrian Economics, visit http://www.fee.org

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Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
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