Henry Henry Hazlitt

Henry Hazlitt (1894-1993) was the great economic journalist of the 20th century. He is the author of Economics in One Lesson among 20 other books. He was chief editorial writer for the New York Times, and wrote weekly for Newsweek. He served in an editorial capacity at The Freeman and was a board member of the Foundation for Economic Education. 

Related Freeman Articles

Clichés of Progressivism

#28 – “Government Spending Brings Jobs and Prosperity”

OCTOBER 24, 2014 by HENRY HAZLITT

The broken-window fallacy reminds us to consider the future as well as the present.

Vintage

Can Unions Really Raise Wages?

What Labor Unions Can and Cannot Do

OCTOBER 03, 2014 by HENRY HAZLITT

A peaceful strike is possible, legitimate, and potentially useful. But the moment workers have to use intimidation or violence to enforce their demands, their case becomes questionable.

Timely Classics

The Early History of FEE

Recollections about the Foundation for Economic Education

MAY 01, 2006 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

The Function of The Freeman

We Must Recognize and Refute Collectivist Errors

JANUARY 01, 2006 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

All Poorer After the War

Our Prosperity Is Bound Up with That of Our Neighbors

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

The Legacy of Marx

Wage Differences Tend to Reflect Real Differences in Productivity

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

The Mont Pelerin Society

How Hayek Formed a Group of 36 Political Scientists, Journalists, and Observers

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

Private Enterprise Regained

Communism Failed in Plymouth Bay Colony, Too

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

Understanding "Austrian" Economics, Part 2

A Few Basic Insights

NOVEMBER 01, 2003 by HENRY HAZLITT
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CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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