Sandy Ikeda

sanford.ikeda@purchase.edu

Sandy Ikeda is a professor of economics at Purchase College, SUNY, and the author of The Dynamics of the Mixed Economy: Toward a Theory of Interventionism.

Related Freeman Articles

Wabi-Sabi

Black and Blue: How the State Brings Order

We need rule of law, not law and order

DECEMBER 11, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

Today, the difference between law and order and rule of law is literally a matter of life and death.

Wabi-Sabi

Incentives 101

Why good intentions fail and passing a law still won’t get it done

NOVEMBER 13, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

The economic way of thinking requires looking at the incentives, not banning the consequences.

Wabi-Sabi

The Power of No

Being able to say no is what enables us to say yes.

OCTOBER 30, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

Being able to say no defines the scope of our personal autonomy, while being able to say yes allows us to creatively explore (or not) the freedom that autonomy gives us.

Wabi-Sabi

The Rule of Law Is Limited by the Size of Government

OCTOBER 16, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

The rule of law confers predictability and constrains power. But as government grows, this principle of minimal government is weakened.

Wabi-Sabi

Wages and the Free Market, Part 2

Innovation Is the Lifeblood of a Healthy Economy

OCTOBER 02, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

When it comes to rising living standards, innovation is far more important than efficiency.

Related Publications

Multimedia

"Don't Tread on Others" vs "Don't Tread on Me"

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by SANDY IKEDA

Dr. Sandy Ikeda explains why he thinks "Don't Tread on Others" is the heart of libertarianism, not "Don't Tread on Me."

In the words of Leonard Read, the founder of FEE, "in order to change the world, we first have to change ourselves." We have to show self restraint, self control, and self discipline, and not use the state apparatus, political means, or the threat of violence to get what we want.

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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