Sandy Ikeda

sanford.ikeda@purchase.edu

Sandy Ikeda is a professor of economics at Purchase College, SUNY, and the author of The Dynamics of the Mixed Economy: Toward a Theory of Interventionism.

Related Freeman Articles

Wabi-Sabi

Trading with “The Other”

Can mutual benefit overcome racism?

MARCH 19, 2015 by SANDY IKEDA

Imagine our shock when we learned that the landlord didn't want to rent to us because of our race.

Wabi-Sabi

Adam Smith: Zen Master

East and West converge on the "power of now"

MARCH 05, 2015 by SANDY IKEDA

Eastern and Western traditions share a powerful insight: "The present moment is all you ever have." Eckhart Tolle, Ludwig von Mises, and Adam Smith agree.

Wabi-Sabi

Competition in the Marketplace of Libertarian Ideas

Reflections on the International Students for Liberty Conference (ISFLC)

FEBRUARY 19, 2015 by SANDY IKEDA

There is no better example of voluntary, peaceful cooperation than what I saw at ISFLC.

Wabi-Sabi

Shut Out: How Land-Use Regulations Hurt the Poor

Economics paints a damning picture of zoning and smart growth

FEBRUARY 05, 2015 by SANDY IKEDA

People sometimes support regulations, often with the best of intentions, but these wind up creating outcomes they don't like. Land-use regulations are a prime example.

Wabi-Sabi

Visions of Progress: Henry George vs. Jane Jacobs

Or, Would You Rather Live in Georgetown or Jacobsville?

JANUARY 22, 2015 by SANDY IKEDA

George disparaged great cities, while Jacobs celebrated them.

Related Publications

Multimedia

"Don't Tread on Others" vs "Don't Tread on Me"

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by SANDY IKEDA

Dr. Sandy Ikeda explains why he thinks "Don't Tread on Others" is the heart of libertarianism, not "Don't Tread on Me."

In the words of Leonard Read, the founder of FEE, "in order to change the world, we first have to change ourselves." We have to show self restraint, self control, and self discipline, and not use the state apparatus, political means, or the threat of violence to get what we want.

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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