Sandy Ikeda

sanford.ikeda@purchase.edu

Sandy Ikeda is a professor of economics at Purchase College, SUNY, and the author of The Dynamics of the Mixed Economy: Toward a Theory of Interventionism.

Related Freeman Articles

Wabi-Sabi

Incentives 101

Why good intentions fail and passing a law still won’t get it done

NOVEMBER 13, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

The economic way of thinking requires looking at the incentives, not banning the consequences.

Wabi-Sabi

The Power of No

Being able to say no is what enables us to say yes.

OCTOBER 30, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

Being able to say no defines the scope of our personal autonomy, while being able to say yes allows us to creatively explore (or not) the freedom that autonomy gives us.

Wabi-Sabi

The Rule of Law Is Limited by the Size of Government

OCTOBER 16, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

The rule of law confers predictability and constrains power. But as government grows, this principle of minimal government is weakened.

Wabi-Sabi

Wages and the Free Market, Part 2

Innovation Is the Lifeblood of a Healthy Economy

OCTOBER 02, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

When it comes to rising living standards, innovation is far more important than efficiency.

Wabi-Sabi

Wages and the Free Market, Part 1

Dispelling labor market myths with theory and data

SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 by SANDY IKEDA

It's popular to claim that efficiency is the enemy of workers. But it's not true.

Related Publications

Multimedia

"Don't Tread on Others" vs "Don't Tread on Me"

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by SANDY IKEDA

Dr. Sandy Ikeda explains why he thinks "Don't Tread on Others" is the heart of libertarianism, not "Don't Tread on Me."

In the words of Leonard Read, the founder of FEE, "in order to change the world, we first have to change ourselves." We have to show self restraint, self control, and self discipline, and not use the state apparatus, political means, or the threat of violence to get what we want.

CURRENT ISSUE

November 2014

It's been 40 years since F. A. Hayek received his Nobel Prize. His insights, particularly on the distribution of knowledge and the impossibility of economic planning, remain hugely important today. In this issue, we look back on the influence of his work. Max Borders and Craig Biddle debate whether liberty must be defended from one absolute foundation, further reflections on Scottish secession, and how technology is already changing our world for the better--including how robots, despite the unease they cause, will only accelerate this process.
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