Nathan Smith

nathan.smith@fresno.edu

Nathan Smith is a professor of economics and finance at Fresno Pacific University, and the author of Principles of a Free Society and Complexity, Competition, and Growth. He blogs at Open Borders: The Case (openborders.info).

Related Freeman Articles

Feature

Zoned Out

Why and how we should seek to restore a free market in land

MARCH 18, 2014 by NATHAN SMITH

Zoning laws bring ordinary people into contact with government perversity. A free land market would improve our wealth, well-being, and environment.

Feature

A Quick Fix Courtesy of Karl Marx

Privatize Social Security and the economy will roar back

NOVEMBER 04, 2013 by NATHAN SMITH

Privatizing Social Security is a good idea long term. But even in the short term, it could get the United States out of the liquidity trap while giving each and every American an ownership stake in the means of production.

Feature

Bring Back the Gilded Age – Part Two

OCTOBER 08, 2013 by NATHAN SMITH

The 1950s and 1960s have often been invoked as a "Golden Age." But the suburban idyll of this time can be attributed to the laissez-faire capitalism of the Gilded Age.

Feature

Bring Back the Gilded Age – Part One

OCTOBER 07, 2013 by NATHAN SMITH

In the Gilded Age, socialism, communism, progressivism, fascism, the welfare state, migration control, and other bad ideas were still young and relatively weak. The result was a mighty wave of betterment of the human condition whose momentum carried it well into the twentieth century.

Feature

Competition and Free Thought: Friedman, Mill, and Educational Choice

DECEMBER 11, 2012 by NATHAN SMITH

Milton Friedman believed State-run schools strangled the productivity improvements to be had from competition; John Stuart Mill believed they strangled independence of thought. Both views have plenty of empirical support, says Nathan Smith.

CURRENT ISSUE

October 2014

Heavily-armed police and their supporters will tell you they need all those armored trucks and heavy guns. It's a dangerous job, not least because Americans have so many guns. But the numbers just don't support these claims: Policing is safer than ever--and it's safer than a lot of common jobs by comparison. Daniel Bier has the analysis. Plus, Iain Murray and Wendy McElroy look at how the Feds are recruiting more and more Americans to do their policework for them.
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