Henry Henry Hazlitt

hhazlitt@fee.org

Henry Hazlitt (1894-1993) was the great economic journalist of the 20th century. He is the author of Economics in One Lesson among 20 other books. He was chief editorial writer for the New York Times, and wrote weekly for Newsweek. He served in an editorial capacity at The Freeman and was a board member of the Foundation for Economic Education. 

Related Freeman Articles

Clichés of Progressivism

#28 – “Government Spending Brings Jobs and Prosperity”

OCTOBER 24, 2014 by HENRY HAZLITT

The broken-window fallacy reminds us to consider the future as well as the present.

Vintage

Can Unions Really Raise Wages?

What Labor Unions Can and Cannot Do

OCTOBER 03, 2014 by HENRY HAZLITT

A peaceful strike is possible, legitimate, and potentially useful. But the moment workers have to use intimidation or violence to enforce their demands, their case becomes questionable.

Timely Classics

The Early History of FEE

Recollections about the Foundation for Economic Education

MAY 01, 2006 by HENRY HAZLITT

Article

The Function of The Freeman

We Must Recognize and Refute Collectivist Errors

JANUARY 01, 2006 by HENRY HAZLITT

Related Publications

Other books

Economics in One Lesson (full text)

The fastest and best way to discover economic basics

SEPTEMBER 24, 2014 by HENRY HAZLITT

The full text of Hazlitt's famed primer on economic principles: read this first!

Multimedia

Economics in One Lesson, by Henry Hazlitt (PDF and full text)

NOVEMBER 16, 2012 by HENRY HAZLITT

This primer on economic principles brilliantly analyzes the seen and unseen consequences of political and economic actions. In the words of F.A. Hayek, there is "no other modern book from which the intelligent layman can learn so much about the basic truths of economics in so short a time."

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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