David J. Hebert

dave.hebert@gmail.com

David Hebert is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Ferris State University. His interests include public finance and property rights.

Related Freeman Articles

Feature

GDP Economics: Fat or Muscle?

GDP calculations say count your hookers and drugs, then skip the gym

OCTOBER 27, 2014 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Changing how productivity is measured does not increase productivity.

Feature

The Paradox of Public Assistance

It’s time to acknowledge the pragmatic problems of welfare

JANUARY 24, 2014 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Instead of simply distributing more welfare, we should focus on removing the barriers that keep people from becoming productive.

Feature

If You Like Your Governance, You Can Keep It

You might be an anarcho-capitalist if you consider this case

DECEMBER 11, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Once you get past the scary terms, the case for anarcho-capitalism resembles the case for, say, being able to shop around for your healthcare.

Feature

That Cold-Hearted Discipline

Good economics teaches cooperation and the limits of politics, not greed

OCTOBER 30, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Economics does not so much teach greed but rather the beauty of cooperation. How else could we explain how a woolen coat gets made, how Paris gets fed, or how a pencil gets made?

Blog

Helping Consumers by Avoiding Taxes

JUNE 24, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Congress has been bullying Apple, Google, and other companies who move business offshore to avoid taxes--even when they do it legally. Simply reducing tax rates would make loopholes less valuable and would benefit both consumers and producers.

CURRENT ISSUE

December 2014

Unfortunately, educating people about phenomena that are counterintuitive, not-so-easy to remember, and suggest our individual lack of human control (for starters) can seem like an uphill battle in the war of ideas. So we sally forth into a kind of wilderness, an economic fairyland. We are myth busters in a world where people crave myths more than reality. Why do they so readily embrace untruth? Primarily because the immediate costs of doing so are so low and the psychic benefits are so high.
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